Sunday, April 2, 2017

13 Icons from the Bible, 16 & 17th Century, with footnotes, #13


Spain or the Netherlands , early 17th century 
Saint Jerome, the Immaculate Conception, St. Francis of Assisi, St. Anthony of Padua and St. Peter
five gilt bronze plates, on a red velvet background; In the same gilt wood frame 
40 x 36.5 cm, 10 x 7 cm (each plate); 15 2/3 by 14 1/3 in., 4 by 2 4/5 (each insert)
Private Collection

France or Italy, sixteenth century 
Pietà
A FRENCH OR ITALIAN 16TH CENTURY GILT BRONZE PAX FIGURING THE PIETÀ
kiss of peace ormolu 
High. 15 cm; 6 in height.
Private Collection

France or Italy, sixteenth century 
Pietà
Detail

Netherlands or Germany, seventeenth century 
The Nativity and Adoration of the Magi
A PAIR OF NETHERLANDS OR GERMAN 17TH CENTURY GILT COPPER RELIEFS WITH THE NATIVITY AND THE ADORATION OF THE MAGI ; ON SILVER FRAMES WITH THE MAKER'S MARK CK
Quantity: 2 
pair of gilded copper plates and rejected; the silver frames punched CK ( London, 1908) 
23 x 19 cm; 9 by 7 1/2 in


 RUSSIAN ICON OF THE TIKHVIN MOTHER OF GOD, CIRCA 1600, MOSCOW
20 inches x 18 inches (51 x 46 cm).


She bears a star upon each shoulder and on her head, signifying her perpetual virginity before, during and after the birth of Christ. Christ delivers a blessing with His right hand and holds a scroll (signifying His wisdom) in His left hand. The Virgin gestures towards Christ, directing the viewer to the source of eternal life-her son. The upper corners painted with Angels. The borders and background overlaid with silver repousse basma strips and the haloes similarly decorated.

This Tikhvin Mother of God is one of four well-known Russian Miracle-Working images of the Mother of God. The original Tikhvin (Below) was believed to have been painted by Saint Luke, who sent it as a gift to the ruler Theophilus at Antioch. After Thoephilus' death it went to Jerusalem. In the 5th century it was sent as a gift to Pulcheria, sister of Theodosius the Younger, in Constantinople and the Church of the Blachernae was built to house it, where it remained for over five hundred years under the title Hodigitria. In 1383, knowing of the approaching fall of Constantinople to the Turks, The icon left that city for Russia. Fishermen saw it in a circle of light over Lake Ladoga, and then it appeared again near Lake Onega, then on the Oyat River, and then twice more, moving ever closer to Tikhvin. Finally, it appeared on the bank of the Tikhvinka River in 1383. In the 16th century it was placed in a brick church dedicated to the Dormition, and in 1613, after the vision of a blind widow, it was used to repel the invading Swedes. In 1944, during the Soviet oppression of the Russian Orthodox Church, the icon was rescued, eventually coming to the United States for safekeeping by future Archbishop John Garklavs. In 2004, it was transferred back to Russia and returned to its home village of Tikhvin. The Tikhvin Mother of God is the Patroness of families. More Tikhvin Mother of God

Luke the evangelist
The Theotokos of Tikhvin in the golden riza
Tikhvin Icon of the Mother of God in salary (Tikhvin)
XV-XVI вв

RUSSIAN ICON OF THE BIRTH OF THE MOTHER OF GOD, 16TH CENTURY, VLADIMIR-SUZDAL.
19.5 inches x 13.5 inches (49.5 x 34.5 cm)
Vladimir-Suzdal, Russia

At left Anna, the mother of Mary, is depicted reclining on a bed after having given birth. Following Jewish tradition, servants at the foot of the bed, wash the newborn Mary and swaddle her and cool her with a fan shown lower right. Behind Anna are two servants serving her food and further back still and to the right is Anna’s husband Joakhim who looks on. The draped red cloth along the upper margin strung between two buildings indicates that this is an interior scene.  The size and shape of the offered icon would suggest it once formed part of the festival tier of an iconostasis.

Vladimir-Suzdal, formally known as the Grand Duchy of Vladimir (1157–1331), was one of the major principalities that succeeded Kievan Rus' in the late 12th century, centered in Vladimir-on-Klyazma. After being conquered by the Mongol Empire, the principality became a self-governed state headed by its own nobility. A governorship of principality, however, was prescribed by a Khan declaration issued from the Golden Horde to a noble family of any of smaller principalities. More Vladimir-Suzdal,



Acknowledgement: Sotheby's, JACKSON'S AUCTIONEERSand others

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