Monday, April 17, 2017

20 Menological Orthodox Calendar Icons from the Bible, with footnotes, #17

Some Saints and Feasts of the Orthodox Christian Church

"As the prophets beheld, as the Apostles have taught, as the Church has received, as the Teachers have dogmatised, as the Universe has agreed, as Grace has shown forth, as Truth has revealed, as falsehood has been dissolved, as Wisdom has presented, as Christ awarded, thus we declare; thus we assert, thus we preach Christ our true God, and honour His Saints in words, in writings, in thoughts, in sacrifices, in Churches, in Holy Icons; on the one hand worshiping and reverencing Christ as God and Lord; and on the other hand honouring as true servants of the same Lord of all and accordingly offering them veneration."  Synodikon of Sunday of Orthodoxy

Icon of Chetyi-Minei (calendar of saints)
In the very center is the Resurrection of Christ surrounded by scenes from Holy Week and the feasts of the Paschal cycle. Around them are twelve groupings of saints: one for each month of the calendar year. In the border are icons of the Theotokos (Mother of God), each of which has a feast day during the liturgical year. More Chetyi-Minei 


Name days are a Greek Orthodox tradition. The Orthodox Church dedicates each day of the year to a martyr or saint, and the day is named after him or her in the Greek Orthodox faith. It’s also a Greek tradition to name children for saints. Those named for saints are expected to imitate their namesakes' lives so that saint’s name day calls for quite a celebration.

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
THE MONTH OF JANUARY,c. early 19th century
Tempera on wood panel with kovcheg. On four registers, starting from the upper left corner, displayed are the saints and events commemorated in the Orthodox calendar
 52.8 x 43.9 cm.
Private collection

Menology; a record of saints, arranged in the order of a calendar.

St. Basil the Great (1 January)
St. Gregory Nazianzen (1 and 25 January)
St. Seraphim of Sarov (2 January)
The Seventy (4 January)
The Theophany (Epiphany) of Christ (6 January)
Synaxis of St. John the Baptist and Forerunner of Christ (7 January)
St. Sava of Serbia (14 January)
St. Paul the hermit of Thebes (15 January)
St. John Kalyvites (15 January)
St. Anthony the Great (17 January)
St. Athanasius the Great (18 January)
St Timothy the Apostle (22 January)
Venerable Joseph the Sanctified (22 January)
St Xeni (24 January)
St Gregory Theologian (25 January)
St Xenophon, Maria and sons (26 January)

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
 MONTH OF FEBRUARY, c. early 19th century
Tempera on wood panel with kovcheg
53 x 44.4 cm.
Private collection

St Tryphon (1 February)
Presentation of Our Lord in the Temple (2 February)
St. Photios the Great (Patriarch of Constantinople; 6 February)
Sts Barsanuphius and John (Holy Fathers; 6 February)
St. Charalambos the Wonder-worker (10 February)
St. Blasios (11 February)
St. Zacharias (Patriarch of Jerusalem; 21 February)
St Eustathios of Antioch (21 February)
St. Polycarp (Bishop of Smyrna; 23 February)
St. Photini, The Samaritan Woman (Great Martyr and Equal to the Apostles; 26 February)
St Kyranna of Thessaloniki (28 February)

MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
 MONTH OF FEBRUARY, c. late 19th century
Tempera on wood panel. Painted in sombre colours on a silvered background, covered by a golden lacquer
35.6 x 31.3 cm.
Private collection

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
 FOR THE MONTH OF MARCH, c. late 18th century
Tempera on wood panel
44 x 35.8 cm.
Private collection

St. Eudokia, Holy Martyr (1 March)
The Holy Forty Martyrs of Sebastia (9 March)
St. Symeon the New Theologian (12 March)
St Alexios, Man of God (17 March)
St Patrick, Enlightener of Ireland (17 March)
The Annunciation of the Holy Theotokos (25 March)
St. Gregory Palamas (27 March)
St. Matrona (27 March)
St. John Climacus (30 March and 4th Sunday of the Great Lent)
St. Innocent (31 March and 23 September)

MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
MONTH OF MARCH, c. late 19th century
Tempera on wood panel. Painted in sombre colours on a silvered background, covered by a golden lacquer
35.7 x 31 cm.
Private collection

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
MONTH OF APRIL, c. early 19th century
Tempera on wood panel with kovcheg
52.7 x 43.9 cm.
Private collection

St. Lazarus Of Bethany (Lazarus Saturday, the Saturday before Palm Sunday)
St. Mary of Egypt (1 April and Fifth Sunday of Great Lent)
Sts. Raphael, Nicholas and Irene (Bright Tuesday)
Sts Agape, Irene and Chione (Virgin-martyrs; 16 April)
St. Alexandra (21 April)
St. George the Great Martyr (23 April)
St. Mark the Apostle and Evangelist (25 April)

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
THE MONTH OF MAY, c. 18th century
Tempera on wood panel. The background made of silver, covered by a golden lacquer. The facial features executed in brown with shades of red
52.6 x 43 cm.
Private collection

Coming of the Holy Spirit - the Feast of Pentecost
All Saints day (1st Sunday after Pentecost)
St. Xenia (3 May)
St. Theodore of Sykeon (5 May)
Holy Apostle St. John the Evangelist (8 May)
St. Glykeria (13 May)
St Pachomios the Great (15 May)
St. Nicholas (Bishop of Myra; Translation of Relics 20 May)
Sts Constantine and Helene (21 May)
St John the Russian (27 May)

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Central Russian, Palekh
THE MONTH OF MAY, circa 1800 
Tempera on wood panel on a gold ground
The panel is divided into four registers showing the Feasts and Saints' Days for the month of May
The figures rendered with classical proportions, their faces painted in great detail, the garments opulently adorned with gold patterns
35.8 x 30.7 cm.
Private collection

MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian,
MONTH JUNE WITH TWELVE IMAGES OF THE MOTHER OF GOD, circa 1880
Tempera on wood panel, executed on a gold ground. The upper and lower frame made of interlaced patterns
35.5 x 30.9 cm.
Private collection

St. Kalliope the Martyr (8 June)
The Day of the Souls (on Saturday)
Sts Theophanes and Pansemne (10 June)
Miraculous Icon of "Axion Esti" (11 June)
Nativity of St. John the Baptist and Forerunner of Christ (24 June)
Holy Apostles Sts Peter and Paul (29 June)

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
 FOR THE MONTH OF JULY, c. early 19th century
Tempera on wood panel with kovcheg
53 x 43.8 cm.
Private collection

St. Andreas (4 July)
St. Prokopios (Great Martyr; 8 July )
St Pankratios (9 July)
St. Euphemia (Great Martyr; 11 July )
Archangel Gabriel (13 July)
St Cyril of Crete (14 July)
Great martyr, St Marina (17 July)
St. Macrina the younger (19 July)
Prophet Elijah (Elias) (20 July)
St Mary Magdalene, Equal to the Apostles (22 July)
St. Anna (Dormition of the Mother of the Theotokos; 25 July)
St. Paraskevi (26 July)
St. Panteleimon (All-Merciful and Great Martyr; 27 July)
St Silas, Silvanos, Apainetos and Crescens (of the Seventy; 30 July)

MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
THE MONTH OF JULY, c. late 19th century
Tempera on wood panel. Painted in sombre colours on a silvered background, covered by a golden lacquer
35.5 x 31 cm.

A MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian, 
THE MONTH OF AUGUST, c. late 19th century
Tempera on wood panel. Painted in sombre colours on a silvered background, covered by a golden lacquer
35.6 x 31 cm.
Private collection

Transfiguration (Metamorphoses) of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ (6 August )
St Ioseph (6 August)
Dormition (Falling-asleep) of the Theotokos and Ever-Virgin Mary (15 August)
St Stamatios the New Martyr (16 August)
Sts Eutychlos and Eutychlanos Cassiane (17 August)
St Irenaeus of Lyons(23 August)
St. Kosmas of Aitolia (24 August)
St. Titus (25 August)
St Charalambos of Crete (28 August )
Beheading of the Baptist and Forerunner St. John (29 August)
St. Alexander (Patriarch of Constantinople; 30 August)

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER, c. early 19th century
Tempera on wood panel with kovcheg
53 x 43.8 cm.
Private collection

Indiction - beginning of Church year (1 September )
St. Symeon the Stylite (1 September)
St. John the faster (2 September)
Nativity of the Theotokos (8 September)
Sts Joachim and Anna (parents of the Theotokos; 9 September)
Feast of the Elevation of the Precious and Life-Giving Cross (14 September)
Sts Faith, Hope, and Charity and their Mother Sophia (September 17)
Holy Protomartyr and Equal-to-the-Apostles Thekla (September 24)
Repose of the Holy Apostle and Evangelist St. John the Theologian (26 September)
Holy Apostle and Evangelist St. John the Theologian (26 September, 8 May)

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Central Russian
 FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER, c.1st half 19th century
Tempera on wood panel. Executed in great detail on a gold ground
44.3 x 37 cm.
Private collection

Sts Cyprian and Justina, Holy Martyrs (2 October)
St. Dionysius the Areopagite (3 October)
Holy Apostle St. Thomas (6 October and Thomas Sunday)
St Pelagia (October 8)
St. Lazaros (17 October)
Holy Apostle and Evangelist St. Luke (18 October)
Holy Apostle St. James the Just (23 October)
St. John of Kronstadt (19 October)
St. Justin the Martyr (20 October)
St. Hilarion the Great (21 October)
St. Dimitrios the Great Martyr (26 October)
St. Timotheos the Esphigmenitis (29 October)

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian,
THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER, c. late 19th century
Tempera on wood panel. The background made of silver, covered by a golden lacquer.
44 x 37.4 cm.
Private collection

Archangels (8 November)
St. Nektarios the Wonderworker (Metropolitan of Pentapolis; 9 November)
St. John Chrysostom (Archbishop of Constantinople; 13 November, and January 1, 27 and 30)
Holy Apostle St. Matthew (16 November)
St. Gregory the Wonderworker (17 November)
Presentation of the Virgin Mary to the Temple (21 November)
Great Martyr St. Catherine (25 November)
St. Stylianos (26 November)
Holy Apostle St. Andrew (30 November)

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Greek
 FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER, c. 18th century
Tempera on wood panel. Figures shown against a gold background
59 x 43.3 cm.
Private collection

MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
 FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER, c. 19th century
Tempera on wood panel with kovcheg, on a gold ground
35 x 31.2 cm
Private collection

LARGE MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian
 FOR THE MONTH OF DECEMBER, c. early 19th century
Tempera on wood panel with kovcheg
53 x 43.2 cm
Private collection

St. John Damascene (4 December)
St. Barbara (4 December)
St. Sabbas the Sanctified (5 December)
St. Nicholas the Wonderworker (6 December)
St. Ambrose (Bishop of Milan; 7 December)
St. Spyridon (12 December)
St. Eleutherios (15 December)
St Dionysios of Zakynthos, the Wonder-Worker (17 December)
St Sebastian the martyr (18 December)
Nativity of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ (25 December)
St. Stephen, the First Martyr (27 December)
The Holy Infants (29 December)

MENOLOGICAL ICON, Russian, 
THE MONTH OF DECEMBER WITH TEN IMAGES OF THE MOTHER OF GOD, c. 2nd half 19th century
Tempera on wood panel, executed on a gold ground
31.5 x 26.7 cm
Private collection









Acknowledgement: Hargesheimer Kunstauktionen DüsseldorfOrthodox Christian Churchand others

Images are copyright of their respective owners, assignees or others

We do not sell art prints, framed posters or reproductions. Ads are shown only to compensate the hosting expenses.

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Saturday, April 15, 2017

14 Icons, Small Byzantine & Russian Icons, from the 4th - 15th Century with footnotes, #15


A SILVER-MOUNTED STEATITE ICON, Byzantine
THE HODIGITRIA MOTHER OF GOD, 10th-12th century
Carved in half-length and supporting a Child on her left hip
3.5 x 2.9 cm.
Soapstone
Private Collection

A Hodegetria is an iconographic depiction of the Theotokos (Virgin Mary) holding the Child Jesus at her side while pointing to Him as the source of salvation for humankind. In the Western Church this type of icon is sometimes called Our Lady of the Way.

The most venerated icon of the Hodegetria type, regarded as the original, was displayed in the Monastery of the Panaghia Hodegetria in Constantinople, which was built specially to contain it. Unlike most later copies it showed the Theotokos standing full-length. It was said to have been brought back from the Holy Land by Eudocia, the Empress of Theodosius II (408–450), and to have been painted by Saint Luke. The icon was double-sided, with a crucifixion on the other side, and was "perhaps the most prominent cult object in Byzantium".

The original icon has probably now been lost, although various traditions claim that it was carried to Russia or Italy. There are a great number of copies of the image, including many of the most venerated of Russian icons, which have themselves acquired their own status and tradition of copying. More A Hodegetria

A STEATITE ICON, Byzantine
 ST. NICHOLAS OF MYRA , 10th-12th century
His name incised in the background
Soapstone
H. 3,3 cm.
Private Collection

Saint Nicholas (15 March 270 – 6 December 343), also called Nikolaos of Myra, was a historic 4th-century Christian saint and Greek Bishop of Myra, in Asia Minor. Because of the many miracles attributed to his intercession, he is also known as Nikolaos the Wonderworker. His reputation evolved among the faithful, as was common for early Christian saints, and his legendary habit of secret gift-giving gave rise to the traditional model of Santa Claus through Sinterklaas.

The historical Saint Nicholas, as known from strict history: He was born at Patara, Lycia in Asia Minor. In his youth he made a pilgrimage to Egypt and the Palestine area. Shortly after his return he became Bishop of Myra and was later cast into prison during the persecution of Diocletian. He was released after the accession of Constantine and was present at the Council of Nicaea. 

He was buried in his church at Myra, and by the 6th century his shrine there had become well-known. In 1087 Italian sailors or merchants stole his alleged remains from Myra and took them to Bari, Italy; this removal greatly increased the saint’s popularity in Europe, and Bari became one of the most crowded of all pilgrimage centres. Nicholas’s relics remain enshrined in the 11th-century basilica of San Nicola at Bari. More of Saint Nicholas

A STEATITE ICON,  Post-Byzantine
ST. NICHOLAS OF MYRA, 15th century 
The saint carved in low relief shown frontally bust-length
Soapstone
3.9 x 3.5 cm. 
Private Collection


A SILVER-MOUNTED GLASS CAMEO, Byzantine, Constantinople or Venice
ST. THEODORE KILLING THE DRAGON, 12th/13th century
Blue pâte de verre
3,6 x 2,9 cm
Private Collection

Theodore Stratelates is a martyr and Warrior Saint venerated with the title Great-martyr in the Eastern Orthodox Church, Eastern Catholic and Roman Catholic Churches.

There is much confusion between him and St. Theodore of Amasea and they were in fact probably the same person, whose legends later diverged into two separate traditions.

Theodore came from the city of Euchaita in Asia Minor. He killed a giant serpent living on a precipice in the outskirts of Euchaita. The serpent had terrorized the countryside. Theodore armed himself with a sword and vanquished it. According to some of the legends, because of his bravery, Theodore was appointed military-commander (stratelates) in the city of Heraclea Pontica, during the time the emperor Licinius (307–324) began a fierce persecution of Christians. Theodore himself invited Licinius to Heraclea, having promised to offer a sacrifice to the pagan gods. He requested that all the gold and silver statues of the gods which they had in Heraclea be gathered up at his house. Theodore then smashed them into pieces which he then distributed to the poor.

Theodore was arrested and subjected to torture and crucified. His servant Varos (also venerated as a saint), witnessed this and recorded it. In the morning the imperial soldiers found him alive and unharmed. Not wanting to flee a martyr's death, Theodore voluntarily gave himself over again into the hands of Licinius, and was beheaded by the sword. This occurred on 8 February 319, on a Saturday, at the third hour of the day. More Theodore Stratelates

A HEMATITE INTAGLIO, Byzantine,
SOLOMON, 4th/5th century 
Incised showing Solomon on horseback killing the Antichrist
Soapstone
2.7 x 2.4 cm.
Private Collection

Solomon was, according to the Bible, a fabulously wealthy and wise king of Israel and a son of David, the previous king of Israel. The conventional dates of Solomon's reign are circa 970 to 931 BC, normally given in alignment with the dates of David's reign. He is described as the third king of the United Monarchy, which would break apart into the northern Kingdom of Israel and the southern Kingdom of Judah shortly after his death. Following the split, his patrilineal descendants ruled over Judah alone.

According to the Talmud, Solomon is one of the 48 prophets. In the Quran, he is considered a major prophet, and Muslims generally refer to him by the Arabic variant Sulayman.

The Hebrew Bible credits him as the builder of the First Temple in Jerusalem. It portrays him as great in wisdom, wealth, and power beyond any of the previous kings of the country, but ultimately as a human king who sinned. His sins included idolatry, marrying foreign women, and ultimately turning away from Yahweh, and led to the kingdom's being torn in two during the reign of his son Rehoboam. Solomon is the subject of many other later references and legends, most notably in the 1st-century apocryphal work known as the Testament of Solomon. In later years, in mostly non-biblical circles, Solomon also came to be known as a magician and an exorcist, with numerous amulets and medallion seals dating from the Hellenistic period invoking his name. More Solomon

A STEATITE ICON, Byzantine, 
ST. THEODORE Byzantine, 10th-12th century
The saint shown frontally half-length holding a spear. 
Soapstone
2.2 x 2.1 cm
Private Collection

A STEATITE ICON, Byzantine, 
ST. THEODORE, 12th century
The name of the saint incised in the background.
Soapstone
4.4 x 3.7 cm
Private Collection

A DOUBLE-SIDED HORN MEDALLION, Russian
THE MOTHER OF GOD AND ST. BASIL THE GREAT, early 16th century 
6.4 x 5.2 cm.
Private Collection

From antiquity, Mary has been called "Theotokos", or "God-Bearer" (Mother of God). The word in Greek is "Theotokos". The term was used as part of the popular piety of the early first millennium church. It is used throughout the Eastern Church's Liturgy, both Orthodox and Catholic. It lies at the heart of the Latin Rite's deep Marian piety and devotion. This title was a response to early threats to 'orthodoxy', the preservation of authentic Christian teaching. A pronouncement of an early Church Council, The Council of Ephesus in 431 A.D., insisted "If anyone does not confess that God is truly Emmanuel, and that on this account the holy virgin is the "Theotokos" (for according to the flesh she gave birth to the word of God become flesh by birth) let him be anathema." (The Council of Ephesus, 431 AD). More Mother of God

Basil of Caesarea, also called Saint Basil the Great (329 or 330 – January 1 or 2, 379), was the Greek bishop of Caesarea Mazaca in Cappadocia, Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey). He was an influential theologian who supported the Nicene Creed and opposed the heresies of the early Christian church, fighting against both Arianism and the followers of Apollinaris of Laodicea. His ability to balance his theological convictions with his political connections made Basil a powerful advocate for the Nicene position.

In addition to his work as a theologian, Basil was known for his care of the poor and underprivileged. Basil established guidelines for monastic life which focus on community life, liturgical prayer, and manual labour. He is remembered as a father of communal monasticism in Eastern Christianity. He is considered a saint by the traditions of both Eastern and Western Christianity. More Basil of Caesarea

A DOUBLE-SIDED HORN MEDALLION, Russian
THE BAPTISM, THE CRUCIFIXION AND TWO SAINTS, early 16th century
8.8 x 5.9 cm.
Private Collection

Baptism is a Christian sacrament of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into the Christian Church generally. The canonical Gospels report that Jesus was baptized —a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned. Baptism has been called a holy sacrament and an ordinance of Jesus Christ. In some denominations, baptism is also called christening, but for others the word "christening" is reserved for the baptism of infants. More Baptism

The crucifixion of Jesus occurred in 1st century Judea, most probably between the years 30 and 33 AD. Jesus' crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources, although, among historians, there is no consensus on the precise details of what exactly occurred. More on The crucifixion

A DOUBLE-SIDED HORN MEDALLION, Russian
THE LAST SUPPER AND THE DORMITION OF THE MOTHER OF GOD, circa 1500 
Carved in relief. Restored. 
Diam. 6.5 cm.
Private Collection

The Last Supper is the final meal that, in the Gospel accounts, Jesus shared with his Apostles in Jerusalem before his crucifixion. The Last Supper provides the scriptural basis for the Eucharist, also known as "Holy Communion" or "The Lord's Supper".

The four canonical Gospels all state that the Last Supper took place towards the end of the week, after Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem and that Jesus and his Apostles shared a meal shortly before Jesus was crucified at the end of that week. During the meal Jesus predicts his betrayal by one of the Apostles present, and foretells that before the next morning, Peter will deny knowing him.

The three Synoptic Gospels and the First Epistle to the Corinthians include the account of the institution of the Eucharist in which Jesus takes bread, breaks it and gives it to the Apostles, saying: "This is my body which is given for you". The Gospel of John does not include this episode, but tells of Jesus washing the feet of the Apostles, giving the new commandment "to love one another as I have loved you", and has a detailed farewell discourse by Jesus, calling the Apostles who follow his teachings "friends and not servants", as he prepares them for his departure.

Scholars have looked to the Last Supper as the source of early Christian Eucharist traditions. Others see the account of the Last Supper as derived from 1st-century eucharistic practice as described by Paul in the mid-50s. More on The Last Supper

The Dormition of the Mother of God is a Great Feast of the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches which commemorates the "falling asleep" or death of Mary the Theotokos ("Mother of God"), and her bodily resurrection before being taken up into heaven. More The Dormition

A DOUBLE-SIDED HORN MEDALLION, Russian
THE NATIVITY AND THE CRUCIFIXION OF CHRIST, circa 1500
Engraved
5.1 x 5.3 cm.
Private Collection

The nativity of Jesus or birth of Jesus is described in the gospels of Luke and Matthew. The two accounts agree that Jesus was born in Bethlehem in the time of Herod the Great to a betrothed virgin whose name was Mary. There are, however, major differences. Matthew has no census, annunciation to the shepherds or presentation in the Temple, implies that Jesus's parents' home is Bethlehem, and has him born in a house there, and has an unnamed angel appear to Joseph to announce the birth. In Luke there are no Magi, no flight into Egypt, or Massacre of the Innocents, Joseph is a resident of Nazareth, the birth appears to take place in an inn instead of the family home, and the angel (named as Gabriel) announces the coming birth to Mary. While it is possible that Matthew's account might be based on Luke or Luke's on Matthew, the majority of scholars conclude that the two are independent of each other.

In Christian theology the nativity marks the incarnation of Jesus as the second Adam, in fulfillment of the divine will of God, undoing the damage caused by the fall of the first man, Adam. The artistic depiction of the nativity has been a major subject for Christian artists since the 4th century. Since the 13th century, the nativity scene has emphasized the humility of Jesus and promoted a more tender image of him, as a major turning point from the early "Lord and Master" image, affecting the basic approaches of Christian pastoral ministry. More on The nativity

The crucifixion of Jesus, see above

SILVER-GILT PENDANT ICON,  Russian
THE SMOLENSKAYA MOTHER OF GOD, 16th century
Silver, cast and gilt. Set with cabochons
Greek inscription '
6.1 x 5 cm.
Private Collection

The Mother of God Smolenskaya Icon is where the Mother of God is depicted from the waist up holding the Christ child. Christ is portrayed in an erect frontal pose, blessing with his right hand and holding a closed scroll in his left. More Mother of God Smolenskaya

SMALL ICON, Russian
THE PROTECTING VEIL OF THE MOTHER OF GOD, circa 1500
Carved wood, metal mount decorated with filigree and set with semi-precious stones
5.8 x 4.6 cm
Private Collection

In the tenth century, in the church of the Blachernae in Constantinople, there was a festival service. It was at a time of difficulty for the Byzantine empire because of the invading Slavs. At this festal service, on the first of October, the feast of the holy hymnographer Romanos, according to the Life of St. Andrew the Fool-for-Christ, who’s a canonized saint in the Orthodox tradition, he was in the church also with a friend of his, Epiphanios, a friend of his who’s also numbered among the saints.

While they were praying, Andrew had this vision of Christ’s mother, Mary, praying in the church and covering the church with her veil and protecting the people. With her were John the Baptist and John the Evangelist, and, in fact, all of the ranks of the prophets and apostles and bishops and saints were seen. The revelation was that the Theotokos was interceding and praying with all of the saints for the Church on earth. More on the veil

METAL SPHRAGIS (SEAL), Russian
THE DORMITION OF THE MOTHER OF GOD, circa 1900
Before baking, each prosphoron is stamped with this special seal
12.4 cm high, Diam. 8.5 cm
Private Collection

In Orthodox Christianity, prosphoron has come to mean specifically the bread offered at the Divine Liturgy (Eucharist).





Acknowledgement: Hargesheimer Kunstauktionen Düsseldorf, and others

Images are copyright of their respective owners, assignees or others

We do not sell art prints, framed posters or reproductions. Ads are shown only to compensate the hosting expenses.

If you enjoyed this post, please share with friends and family.