Sunday, May 20, 2018

01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - CONTEMPORARY & 20th Century Interpretation of the Bible! With Footnotes - 25

Erik Thor Sandberg
Purgatory
Oil on Canvas
Private collection


Purgatory, the condition, process, or place of purification or temporary punishment in which, according to medieval Christian and Roman Catholic belief, the souls of those who die in a state of grace are made ready for heaven. Purgatory has come to refer as well to a wide range of historical and modern conceptions of postmortem suffering short of everlasting damnation. More on Purgatory

Erik Thor Sandberg (b. Quantico, VA 1975) is an artist based in Washington, DC. Sandberg is known for his masterful oil paintings of the human figure and landscape. Creating inventive imagery ranging from panoramic to intimate, Sandberg pushes the skillful illusionism of master painting to the contemporary edge of Magic Realism. His work has been exhibited at public and private venues internationally, including the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, MD, and is in numerous private collections. More Erik Thor Sandberg



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01 Paintings, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, with footnotes # 20

Prague School, circa 1580
THE ABDUCTION OF EUROPA
oil on copper
16 by 21 5/8  in.; 40.6 by 55 cm
Private collection

In Greek mythology Europa was the mother of King Minos of Crete, a woman with Phoenician origin of high lineage, and for whom the continent Europe was named. The story of her abduction by Zeus in the form of a white bull was a Cretan story; as classicist Károly Kerényi points out, "most of the love-stories concerning Zeus originated from more ancient tales describing his marriages with goddesses. This can especially be said of the story of Europa.

The mythographers tell that Zeus was enamored of Europa and decided to seduce or ravish her. He transformed himself into a tame white bull and mixed in with her father's herds. While Europa and her helpers were gathering flowers, she saw the bull, caressed his flanks, and eventually got onto his back. Zeus took that opportunity and ran to the sea and swam, with her on his back, to the island of Crete. He then revealed his true identity, and Europa became the first queen of Crete. More on Europa

This refined cabinet work arose from within the Prague School at the end of the sixteenth century.  The painting may relate in composition to the lost painting by Bartholomeus Spränger of the same subject recorded in the 1621 inventory of Rudolf II's collection.  More on this painting














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01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation of the Bible!, With Footnotes - 97

DANUBE SCHOOL, CIRCA 1520
Two wings from an altarpiece: The Martyrdom of Saint Catherine; The Martyrdom of Saint Barbara
Oil on fir panel
58 1/4  by 26 3/8  in.; 148 by 67 cm.; 
Private Collection

The Danube School or Donau School was a circle of painters of the first third of the 16th century in Bavaria and Austria (mainly along the Danube valley). Many also were innovative printmakers, usually in etching. They were among the first painters to regularly use pure landscape painting, and their figures, influenced by Matthias Grünewald, are often highly expressive, if not expressionist. They show little Italian influence, and also represent a decisive break with the high finish of Northern Renaissance painting, using a more painterly style that was in many ways ahead of its time. More on The Danube School

DANUBE SCHOOL, CIRCA 1520
Detail: The Martyrdom of Saint Catherine
Oil on fir panel
58 1/4  by 26 3/8  in.; 148 by 67 cm.; 
Private Collection

Saint Catherine of Alexandria is, according to tradition, a Christian saint and virgin, who was martyred in the early 4th century at the hands of the pagan emperor Maxentius. According to her hagiography, she was both a princess and a noted scholar, who became a Christian around the age of fourteen, and converted hundreds of people to Christianity. She was martyred around the age of 18. Over 1,100 years following her martyrdom, St. Joan of Arc identified Catherine as one of the Saints who appeared to her and counselled her.

The femperor condemned Catherine to death on a spiked breaking wheel, but, at her touch, it shattered. Maxentius ordered her to be beheaded. Catherine herself ordered the execution to commence. A milk-like substance rather than blood flowed from her neck.


The Eastern Orthodox Church venerates her as a Great Martyr, and celebrates her feast day on 24 or 25 November (depending on the local tradition). In the Catholic Church she is traditionally revered as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. In 1969 the Catholic Church removed her feast day from the General Roman Calendar; however, she continued to be commemorated in the Roman Martyrology on 25 November. More on Saint Catherine of Alexandria

DANUBE SCHOOL, CIRCA 1520
Detail: The Martyrdom of Saint Barbara
Oil on fir panel
58 1/4  by 26 3/8  in.; 148 by 67 cm.; 
Private Collection

Saint Barbara is a former Christian saint and virgin martyr believed to have lived in Asia Minor in the 3rd century. Her story dates to the 7th century and is retold in the Golden Legend. It is as follows: Dioscurus, the father of Barbara, was a heartless nobleman who had a tower built so that he could lock his daughter away to deter suitors. At first the tower only had two windows; however, Barbara persuaded the workmen to add a third when her father wasn't looking. She also secretly admitted a priest disguised as a doctor, who baptized her to become Christian. When her father returned, Barbara declared that the three windows symbolized the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost who ignited her soul. Dioscurus grew enraged and chased his daughter who had fled the tower. She hid in the crevice of a rock; however, a shepherd told her father of her hiding place. Once found, Barbara was dragged out by the hair and beaten by her father who next handed her over to the Roman authorities. She refused to renounce her Christian beliefs and was tortured. Miraculously, at the moment of her execution by her father's sword, he was struck by lightning, his body devoured by fire. More on Saint Barbara




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Saturday, May 19, 2018

01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - CONTEMPORARY & 20th Century Interpretation of the Bible! With Footnotes - 20

Magnus Gjoen, United Kingdom
LAST NIGHT I HAD A DREAM
Giclée on Paper
Size: 39.4 H x 39.4 W x 0.1 in

Based on a dream Magnus had but also commenting on religions long arms and habit of trying to pull people in with promises of salvation and life in eternity. 

Magnus Gjoen was born in London to Norwegian parents. He grew up in Switzerland, Denmark, Italy as well as in the UK. As a contemporary artist Gjoen has exhibited worldwide and questions the notions of beauty by juxtaposing a range of styles and media, incorporating a street and pop aesthetic with a fine art approach. His pieces draw on history and allusion, using existing artworks or fragments from the past to create his own, contemporary aesthetic.  Describing himself as an ‘accidental’ artist, Gjoen studied fine art and fashion design which led to a successful career in fashion, working for brands such as Vivienne Westwood. 

Gjoen’s art offers a modern spin on old masterpieces or manipulates powerful and strong objects into something fragile yet beautiful. By blending two genres from completely different worlds, his art is about rediscovery, taking things from the past and renewing them for the contemporary market. Breathing fresh air into dusty old paintings found in the far corners of a museum or lending a sense of beauty and grace to typically powerful, even dangerous objects, Magnus Gjoen’s work invites a second look. It’s this ability to engage with the viewer and get them questioning, challenging and thinking that makes him a promising and successful young artist in the contemporary art world. More on Magnus Gjoen








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01 Paintings, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, with footnotes # 19

Giovanni Bilivert, FLORENCE 1585 - 1644
VENUS, CUPID AND PAN
Oil on copper
18 by 13 in.; 45.7 by 33 cm.
Private collection

Venus, goddess of love, is dipping her feet in a shallow, crystalline pond.  Naked save for her pearl headdress and earrings, she is assisted by Cupid who washes her left leg.  He is naked as well, wearing only a silk sash that billows up behind him as he bends forward.  Standing in the background is Pan who holds Venus’s crimson cloak and a shepherd’s crook, his attribute as god of the wild and protector of flocks.  More on this painting

Giovanni Biliverti,  (Florence, 25 August 1585 – Florence, 16 July 1644) was an Italian painter of the late-Mannerism and early-Baroque period, active mainly in his adoptive city of Florence, as well as Rome. Biliverti was born as Jan Bilevelt. After his father’s death in 1603, Giovanni worked in the studio of Lodovico Cigoli, following him in April 1604 till 1607 to Rome. There he worked in projects approved by Pope Clement VIII.

In 1609 Bilivert joined the Medici-sponsored guild of artists, the Accademia del Disegno in Florence. Bilivert was employed by Cosimo II de' Medici from 1611 until 1621, as a designer for works in pietra durai. Late in life, he became blind. Among his pupils were Cecco Bravo, Agostino Melissi, Baccio del Bianco, and Orazio Fidani. He painted a Hagar in the Desert once in the Hermitage and a Christ and the Samaritan Woman once in the Belvedere in Vienna. More on Giovanni Biliverti




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01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation of the Bible!, With Footnotes - 96

Paul La Tarte, DIED 1636 PONT-À-MOUSSON
SAINT IRENE CRADLING THE HEAD OF SAINT SEBASTIAN
oil on canvas
24 3/4  by 22 in.; 63 by 55.8 cm.
Private collection

The subject of the present painting is taken from the legend of the saint and martyr Sebastian, who, after being discovered as a Christian by the Emperor Diocletian, was ordered to be shot by arrows and left for dead.  The widow Irene nursed him back to health and with renewed faith in Christ he again confronted the Emperor.  Though more common depictions of Sebastian show him having been shot with arrows, tied to a tree or column, La Tarte chose to paint a more tender part of the story, when Irene was nursing him back to health.  Interestingly, one of the most famous depictions of Irene tending to Saint Sebastian is by La Tarte's fellow Lorrainian Georges de la Tour. More on this painting

Irene of Rome was the widow of the martyr St. Castulus. After the death of her husband, she continued to be active in the Christian community in Rome. According to legend, when Saint Sebastian was discovered to be a Christian, in 286, he was handed over to the Mauretanian archers, who tied him to a tree and pierced him with arrows.

However, Irene came to bury the body and found that he was not quite dead. Irene took him to her lodgings and nursed him back to health. Irene is venerated by Christians for her virtuous care in attending the injured. More on Irene of Rome

Saint Sebastian (died c. 288 AD) was an early Christian saint and martyr. Sebastian had prudently concealed his faith, but in 286 was detected. Diocletian reproached him for his betrayal, and he commanded him to be led to a field and there to be bound to a stake so that archers from Mauritania would shoot arrows at him. "And the archers shot at him till he was as full of arrows as an urchin is full of pricks, and thus left him there for dead." Miraculously, the arrows did not kill him.


Sebastian later stood by a staircase where the emperor was to pass and harangued Diocletian for his cruelties against Christians. This freedom of speech, and from a person whom he supposed to have been dead, greatly astonished the emperor; but, recovering from his surprise, he gave orders for his being seized and beat to death with cudgels, and his body thrown into the common sewer. A pious lady, called Lucina, admonished by the martyr in a vision, got it privately removed, and buried it in the catacombs at the entrance of the cemetery of Calixtus, where now stands the Basilica of St. Sebastian. More St. Sebastian

Paul La Tarte. Very little is known about La Tarte's life.  He died in 1636 in Pont-à-Mousson in Lorraine and his name appears in a number of old collection inventories from the area. Lorraine produced a number of important artists in the early 17th century, including Jacques Callot (1592-1635), Claude Lorrain (1600-1682), and Georges de la Tour (1593-1652).  While most of these artists spent time in Rome, it is unclear whether La Tarte ever traveled to Italy.  He certainly, however, was aware of the Caravaggist style that spread beyond Rome after the painter's death in 1610. More on Paul La Tarte













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01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation of the Bible! by the Old Masters, With Footnotes - 91

Florentine School, 16th century
JUDITH
oil on canvas
39 7/8  by 32 in.; 101.4 by 81.3 cm.
Private collection

The Book of Judith is the Old Testament of the Bible. The story revolves around Judith, a daring and beautiful widow, who is upset with her Jewish countrymen for not trusting God to deliver them from their foreign conquerors. She goes with her loyal maid to the camp of the enemy general, Holofernes, with whom she slowly ingratiates herself, promising him information on the Israelites. Gaining his trust, she is allowed access to his tent one night as he lies in a drunken stupor. She decapitates him, then takes his head back to her fearful countrymen. The Assyrians, having lost their leader, disperse, and Israel is saved. Though she is courted by many, Judith remains unmarried for the rest of her life. More on The Book of Judith

Florentine School was a major Italian school of art that flourished between the 13th and 16th centuries, extending from the Early Renaissance to the crisis of Renaissance culture.

The founder of the Florentine school was Giotto, whose work placed Florence in the foreground of pre-Renaissance art. The work of his successors, who included Taddeo Gaddi and Maso di Banco, developed along the lines he had originated. However, toward the middle of the 14th century conciseness and clarity of form (as seen in the work of A. di Bonaiuti) disappeared, and a tendency toward linear and flat form became prevalent (Nardo di Cione and, occasionally, Orcagna). In the last 30 years of the 14th century a trend toward the international Gothic style prevailed (Agnolo Gaddi and Lorenzo Monaco). More on Florentine School




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Sunday, May 13, 2018

01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation the Crow, With Footnotes - 108

Rick Bartow, 1948 - 2016
Creation of Crow, 2014
Acrylic on Canvas
36 x 48 inches
Froelick Gallery, Portland

Coyote is a mythological character common to many cultures of the indigenous peoples of North America, based on the coyote animal. This character is usually male and is generally anthropomorphic although he may have some coyote-like physical features. The myths and legends which include Coyote vary widely from culture to culture.


Coyote has been compared to both the Scandinavian Loki, and also Prometheus, who shared with Coyote the trick of having stolen fire from the gods as a gift for mankind, and Anansi, a mythological culture hero from Western African mythology. In Eurasia, rather than a coyote, a fox is often featured as a trickster hero, ranging from kitsune (fox) tales in Japan to the Reynard cycle in Western Europe. More on Coyote

Rick Bartow, one of the nation’s most prominent contemporary Native American artists, was born in Newport, Oregon, in 1946, and was a member of the Wiyot tribe of Northern California. He graduated in 1969 from Western Oregon University with a degree in secondary arts education and served in the Vietnam War (1969-71). His work is permanently held in more than 60 public institutions in the U.S., including Yale University Art Gallery, CT; Brooklyn Museum, NY; and Peabody Essex Museum, MA. He has had 35 solo museum exhibitions and his art has been referenced in over 250 books, catalogs, and articles. In 2012, commissioned by The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, Bartow created We Were Always Here, a monumental pair of sculptures, over 20 feet high, which was installed on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. More on Rick Bartow






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01 Paintings, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, with footnotes, #10b

Peter Paul Rubens, 1577 - 1640
Minerva protects Pax from Mars ('Peace and War'), c. 1629-30
Oil on canvas
203.5 x 298 cm
The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London

Minerva drives away Mars, god of war, in Rubens' powerful anti-war painting, a visual plea for peace between England and Spain in 1630, presented as a gift to Charles I from Philip IV

The painting was probably executed in England in 1629-30, illustrating Rubens's hopes for the peace he was trying to negotiate between England and Spain in his role as envoy to Philip IV of Spain. Rubens presented the finished work to Charles I of England as a gift.

The central figure represents Pax (Peace) in the person of Ceres, goddess of the earth, sharing her bounty with the group of figures in the foreground. The children have been identified as portraits of the children of Rubens's host, Sir Balthasar Gerbier, a painter-diplomat in the service of Charles I. 

To the right of Pax is Minerva, goddess of wisdom. She drives away Mars, the god of war, and Alecto, the fury of war. A winged cupid and the god of marriage, Hymen, lead the children (the fruit of marriage) to a cornucopia, or horn of plenty. The satyr and leopard are part of the entourage of Bacchus, another fertility god, and leopards also draw Bacchus's chariot. Two nymphs or maenads approach from the left, one brings riches, the other dances to a tambourine. A putto holds an olive wreath, symbol of peace, and the caduceus of Mercury, messenger of the gods. More om this painting

Sir Peter Paul Rubens (28 June 1577 – 30 May 1640) was a Flemish Baroque painter. A proponent of an extravagant Baroque style that emphasized movement, colour, and sensuality, Rubens is well known for his Counter-Reformation altarpieces, portraits, landscapes, and history paintings of mythological and allegorical subjects.
In addition to running a large studio in Antwerp that produced paintings popular with nobility and art collectors throughout Europe, Rubens was a classically educated humanist scholar and diplomat who was knighted by both Philip IV of Spain and Charles I of England.  More Sir Peter Paul Rubens



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01 Paintings, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, with footnotes, #10a

Sebastiano Ricci, BELLUNO 1659 - 1734 VENICE
VENUS IN THE FORGE OF VULCAN
Venus going to Vulcan for the Arms of Aeneas
Oil on canvas
73 1/8  by 102 1/2  in.; 185.7 by 260.2 cm.
Private collection

Venus, the goddess of love, looks down at Cupid. Venus went to her husband Vulcan's forge and asked him to make arms for her son Aeneas. 

Sebastiano Ricci (1 August 1659 – 15 May 1734) was an Italian painter of the late Baroque school of Venice. About the same age as Piazzetta, and an elder contemporary of Tiepolo, he represents a late version of the vigorous and luminous Cortonesque style of grand manner fresco painting. More on Sebastiano Ricci





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Thursday, May 10, 2018

01 Antique Religious Carvings - Sculptures from the Bible, with footnotes, 9

Late 15th century carved wooden figure of the Virgin of Mercy, presumably Central German
Detail

The crowned Virgin is depicted in contrapposto, wearing a long richly draped gold cloak and holding the nude Christ Child in Her left arm, the right arm would have formerly held a sceptre, which is now lacking. Two angels to the left and right of the Virgin extend Her cloak to shelter fourteen figures kneeling in prayer. On the left we see a Pope, Cardinal, Bishop, monks, and a nun as representatives of the ecclesiastical caste, and on the right the worldly order is depicted in the guise of a King, knight, and soldiers. More on this carving

Late 15th century carved wooden figure of the Virgin of Mercy, presumably Central German

The Virgin of Mercy is a subject in Christian Art, showing a group of people sheltering for protection under the outspread cloak, or pallium, of the Virgin Mary. It was especially popular in Italy from the 13th to 16th centuries, often as a specialised form of votive portrait, and is also found in other countries and later art, especially Catalonia and Latin America. In Italian it is known as the Madonna della Misericordia (Madonna of Mercy). More on The Virgin of Mercy



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01 Antique Religious Carvings - Ivory Sculptures from the Bible, with footnotes, 8

A late 14th century French carved ivory relief of the Crucifixion

A diptych is any object with two flat plates attached at a hinge. From the Middle Ages many panel paintings took the diptych form, as small portable works for personal use; Eastern Orthodox ones may be called "travelling icons". Although the tryptych form was more common, there were also ivory diptychs with religious scenes carved in relief, a form found first in Byzantine art before becoming very popular in the Gothic period in the West, where they were mainly produced in Paris. These suited the mobile lives of medieval elites. More on diptychs

High-relief depiction with a plain border, formerly the right wing of a hinged diptych. The piece depicts numerous figures attendant at the Crucifixion. We see Christ being offered the sponge and Longinus with the lance below him. The mourning Virgin is depicted on the left with Saint John and Mary Magdalene, two prophets are seen on the right, and in the upper arches we see two angels with symbols of the sun and moon.. More on this carving

When ivory reappeared in northern Europe in the mid-thirteenth century, artists and patrons quickly renewed the art of ivory carving. Instead of a revival of earlier forms, however, the Gothic period saw the revival of a new range of ivory object types: statuettes and statuette groups for the church or the private home; small paneled objects called diptychs (two panels), triptychs (three panels), and polyptychs (many panels) with scenes in low relief that unfold for private meditation; and luxury objects for personal use, such as combs, mirror backs, writing tablets, and caskets. The golden age of Gothic ivory carving spanned a century and a half, from about 1230 to 1380, at which point the supply of ivory to northern Europe again dwindled. More on Ivory Carving in the Gothic Era

The crucifixion of Jesus occurred in 1st century Judea, most probably between the years 30 and 33 AD. Jesus' crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources.

According to the canonical gospels, Jesus, the Christ, was arrested, tried, and sentenced by Pontius Pilate to be scourged, and finally crucified by the Romans. Jesus was stripped of his clothing and offered wine mixed with gall to drink, before being crucified. He was then hung between two convicted thieves and according to Mark's Gospel, died some six hours later. During this time, the soldiers affixed a sign to the top of the cross stating "Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews" in three languages. They then divided his garments among them, but cast lots for his seamless robe. After Jesus' death they pierced his side with a spear to be certain that he had died. More on the crucifixion




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01 Antique Religious Carvings - Ivory Sculptures from the Bible, with footnotes, 7

Late 14th century French carved ivory diptych with the Annunciation and the Crucifixion

A diptych is any object with two flat plates attached at a hinge. From the Middle Ages many panel paintings took the diptych form, as small portable works for personal use; Eastern Orthodox ones may be called "travelling icons". Although the tryptych form was more common, there were also ivory diptychs with religious scenes carved in relief, a form found first in Byzantine art before becoming very popular in the Gothic period in the West, where they were mainly produced in Paris. These suited the mobile lives of medieval elites. More on diptychs

The panel on the left depicts the annunciation to Mary with the angel Gabriel and the dove of the Holy Spirit and on the right the Crucifixion with the Virgin and John the Baptist, both scenes beneath Gothic arch borders. More on this carving

When ivory reappeared in northern Europe in the mid-thirteenth century, artists and patrons quickly renewed the art of ivory carving. Instead of a revival of earlier forms, however, the Gothic period saw the revival of a new range of ivory object types: statuettes and statuette groups for the church or the private home; small paneled objects called diptychs (two panels), triptychs (three panels), and polyptychs (many panels) with scenes in low relief that unfold for private meditation; and luxury objects for personal use, such as combs, mirror backs, writing tablets, and caskets. The golden age of Gothic ivory carving spanned a century and a half, from about 1230 to 1380, at which point the supply of ivory to northern Europe again dwindled. More on Ivory Carving in the Gothic Era

The Annunciation referred to as the Annunciation to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Annunciation of Our Lady, or the Annunciation of the Lord, is the Christian celebration of the announcement by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary that she would conceive and become the mother of Jesus, the Son of God, marking his Incarnation. Gabriel told Mary to name her son Yehoshua , meaning "YHWH is salvation".


According to Luke 1:26, the Annunciation occurred "in the sixth month" of Elizabeth's pregnancy. Many Christians observe this event with the Feast of the Annunciation on 25 March, an approximation of the northern vernal equinox nine full months before Christmas, the ceremonial birthday of Jesus. In England, this came to be known as Lady Day. It marked the new year until 1752. The 2nd-century writer Irenaeus of Lyon regarded the conception of Jesus as 25 March coinciding with the Passion. More The Annunciation

The crucifixion of Jesus occurred in 1st century Judea, most probably between the years 30 and 33 AD. Jesus' crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources.

According to the canonical gospels, Jesus, the Christ, was arrested, tried, and sentenced by Pontius Pilate to be scourged, and finally crucified by the Romans. Jesus was stripped of his clothing and offered wine mixed with gall to drink, before being crucified. He was then hung between two convicted thieves and according to Mark's Gospel, died some six hours later. During this time, the soldiers affixed a sign to the top of the cross stating "Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews" in three languages. They then divided his garments among them, but cast lots for his seamless robe. After Jesus' death they pierced his side with a spear to be certain that he had died. More on the crucifixion




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Wednesday, May 9, 2018

01 Fresco, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, pictorial decoration of the mansions of Pompeii, with footnotes, #10a

House of Venus and Mars/ Ares and Aphrodite
Between circa 75 and circa 100 AD
Fresco on plaster
cm 99 x 90
National Archaeological Museum of Naples 


Venus and Mars Fresco  above shows the Roman gods Venus, goddess of love, and Mars, god of war, in an allegory of beauty and valour. 

The Fresco was probably intended to commemorate a wedding, and to adorn the bedroom of the bride and groom. This is suggested by the wide format and the close view of the figures. It is widely seen as representation of an ideal view of sensuous love

Mars lifts the blue mantle of Venus, to admire its nudity characterized only by a gold chain arranged in X. Characteristic is the representation of the two sexes which provides for a brown complexion for the man and clear and delicate for the woman. Cupid plays with the weapons of Mars. The shield and the helmet reflect reflections of light. More on this mosaic



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03 Carvings, Biblical Carvings & Sculpture With Footnotes 6

A carved wooden crucifix figure without cross
Republic of Benin. Late 19th to early 20th century
13 3/4"h x 11"w x 2 1/2"d.
Private collection

A brass crucifix with multiple figures
Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kongo. Late 19th to earch 20th century
 11"h x 6 1/4"w x 3/4"d
Private collection

African crucifixes are the result of the adoption and almagmation of disperate relgious views. Christan iconography was first introduced to the African content in the 15th century by the Portuguese. By the early sixteenth century the king of Kongo was baptized and began a partnership with the king of Portugal. To reinforce his power and ties to the Catholic Church, prestige piece were made echoing Christian designs and symbolism. Piece are still made today that blend the traditions of African art with those of the Christian Church. More on African crucifixes

A carved wooden effigy figure of St. Antoine, a Franciscan Monk 
Possibly Democratic Republic of the Congo. Late 19th to early 20th century
10 1/2"h x 3"w x 3 1/2"d

Saint Anthony of Padua (Portuguese: Santo António), born Fernando Martins de Bulhões (1195 – 13 June 1231), also known as Anthony of Lisbon, was a Portuguese Catholic priest and friar of the Franciscan Order. He was born and raised by a wealthy family in Lisbon, Portugal, and died in Padua, Italy. Noted by his contemporaries for his forceful preaching, expert knowledge of scripture, and undying love and devotion to the poor and the sick, he was the second-most-quickly canonized saint after Peter of Verona. He was proclaimed a Doctor of the Church on 16 January 1946. He is also the patron saint of lost things. More on Saint Anthony of Padua



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I don't own any of these images - credit is always given when due unless it is unknown to me. if I post your images without your permission, please tell me.

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Saturday, May 5, 2018

01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Contemporary Interpretation of the Bible! With Footnotes - 10h

Deborah Stevenson, United States
The Sin Of Shame
Collage
Size: 8.4 H x 7.7 W x 0.1 in

Shame has plagued us since Adam and Eve bit into the fruit and realized they were naked. Their first instinct was to hide from each other and God (Genesis 3:7–11). They now stood guilty before God and were vulnerable to each other. They were sinful, weak, damaged people living in a dangerous world. They found themselves exposed to other sinners’ judgment and rejection. More on Shame

Deborah Stevenson was born in Washington, DC. She grew up in Tokyo, went to high school in Baltimore, and got her BA from Sarah Lawrence College in New York. She lived for many years on the West Coast, and returned to the East Coast, where she lived in Brooklyn, NYC until 2015, when she relocated to the coastal town of Belfast, Maine. 

Artist Statement: "My first medium is oil, and I have been a painter for nearly 30 years. I began composing collage pieces in earnest 5 years ago, working with material in magazines, books, newspapers, etc. A life-long interest in Eastern philosophy and Jungian psychology have contributed to my fascination with allegory and symbology. Themes that recur in my work express metaphorically my exploration of concepts of power, beauty, the Feminine, and mysterious archetypal conjunctions. More than anything else, the process requires of me that I pay attention, and to be in a receptive state, so as to be ready to capture the dialogue." More on Deborah Stevenson




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