Friday, September 21, 2018

01 Painting, Olympian deities, with footnotes # 26

Maximilian Pirner  (1854–1924)
Hekate , c. 1901
Pastel on paper
55 × 89 cm (21.6 × 35 in)
Private collection

Hecate or Hekate is a goddess in ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding a pair of torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery. She appears in the Homeric Hymn to Demeter and in Hesiod's Theogony, where she is promoted strongly as a great goddess. The place of origin of her following is uncertain, but it is thought that she had popular followings in Thrace. She was one of the main deities worshiped in Athenian households as a protective goddess and one who bestowed prosperity and daily blessings on the family. In the post-Christian writings of the Chaldean Oracles (2nd–3rd century CE) she was regarded with rulership over earth, sea, and sky, as well as a more universal role as Saviour, Mother of Angels and the Cosmic World Soul. Regarding the nature of her cult, it has been remarked, "she is more at home on the fringes than in the center of Greek polytheism. Intrinsically ambivalent and polymorphous, she straddles conventional boundaries and eludes definition." More on Hekate 

Maximilian Pirner (February 13, 1853 in Schüttenhofen, Bohemia – April 2, 1924 in Prague) was a Czech painter. He was a member of the Vienna Secession, and associated with the Mánes Union of Fine Arts.

He was enrolled from 1872 to 1874 at the Academy of Fine Arts, Prague and from 1875 to 1879 at the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna. He remained in Vienna until 1887, although he was not an active participant in the local artistic community. At that time, he became a teacher at the Academy in Prague and was named a Professor there in 1896

Pirner's usual themes were classical mythology (such as his Medusa (1891) and Hecate (Above). Pirner completed a number of sketches of female figures, many of them nudes. He also did stained glass windows and medals.


Described by one critic as having achieved "mastery of the sinuous line". Pirner also had his detractors. One contemporary critic, while acknowledging Pirner's talent, considered him an "over-sophisticated mystic." More on Maximilian Pirner 





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01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation the bible, With Footnotes - 115

Follower of Albrecht Bouts, Late 16th Century
CHRIST CROWNED WITH THORNS AND THE VIRGIN OF SORROWS
Oil on panel
29 1/2  by 39 1/2  in.; 75 by 100.5 cm.
Private collection


According to three of the canonical Gospels, a woven crown of thorns was placed on the head of Jesus during the events leading up to the crucifixion of Jesus. It was one of the instruments of the Passion, employed by Jesus' captors both to cause him pain and to mock his claim of authority. It is mentioned in the gospels of Matthew ('And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee and mocked him, saying Hail, King of the Jews!' More on the Crown of thorns

Our Lady of Sorrows, the Sorrowful Mother or Mother of Sorrows, and Our Lady of Piety, Our Lady of the Seven Sorrows or Our Lady of the Seven Dolours are names by which the Blessed Virgin Mary is referred to in relation to sorrows in her life. As Mater Dolorosa, it is also a key subject for Marian art in the Catholic Church.

The Seven Sorrows of Mary are a popular Roman Catholic devotion. In common religious Catholic imagery, the Blessed Virgin Mary is portrayed in a sorrowful and lacrimating affect, with seven daggers piercing her heart, often bleeding. Devotional prayers that consist of meditation began to elaborate on her Seven Sorrows based on the prophecy of Simeon. Common examples of piety under this title are Servite rosary, or the Chaplet of the Seven Sorrows of Our Lady and the Seven Joys of Mary and more recently, "Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary". More on Lady of Sorrows

Aelbrecht Bouts (c.1452 - March 1549) was a Belgian painter of the Early Netherlandish era. He was born into a family of painters in Leuven. Aelbrecht’s father was Dieric Bouts the Elder (c. 1415-1475), and his brother was Dieric Bouts the Younger (c. 1448-1490). Jan Bouts (c. 1478-c. 1530), son of Dieric Bouts the Younger, also became a painter. Dieric Bouts the Younger inherited his father’s shop in 1475, while Aelbrecht established his own workshop, also in Leuven. Whereas Dieric the Younger continued in his father's style, Aelbrecht developed his own unmistakable style with strong colors, rich texture and fine details. He died in Leuven. More on Aelbrecht Bouts





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Thursday, September 20, 2018

01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - CONTEMPORARY & 20th Century Interpretation of the Bible! With Footnotes - 22


Jean Béraud, (1849–1935)
St. Mary Magdalene in the House of Simon the Pharisee, c. 1891
Oil on canvas
Musée d'Orsay

The Parable of the Two Debtors: A Pharisee invited Jesus to eat, and Jesus went to his house. He was sitting at the table, when a woman of ill repute arrived with an alabaster jar full of perfume. Crying, she stood next to Jesus' feet and began to bathe them with his tears. Then she dried them with her hair, kissed them and poured the perfume on them. Seeing this, the Pharisee who had invited Jesus thought: "If this man were truly a prophet he would realize who and what kind of woman this sinner is touching him." 

Then Jesus said to the Pharisee: You see this woman? I went into your house and you did not give me water for my feet; instead, this woman has bathed my feet with tears and dried them with her hair. You did not kiss me, but she, since I entered, has not stopped kissing my feet. You did not spill oil on my head, but she has spilled perfume on my feet. This is why I tell you that her many sins are forgiven, because she loved so much; but the one to whom little is forgiven, little love manifests. Then he said to the woman: -Your sins are forgiven. More on The Parable of the Two Debtors

Jean Béraud (January 12, 1849 – October 4, 1935) was a French painter, noted for his paintings of Parisian life during the Belle Époque. He was renowned in Paris society due to his numerous paintings depicting the life of Paris, and the nightlife of Paris society. He also painted religious subjects in a contemporary setting. Pictures of the Champs Elysees, cafeés, Montmartre and the banks of the Seine are precisely detailed illustrations of everyday Parisian era of the "Belle Époque". More Jean Béraud,




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01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation the bible, With Footnotes - 114

Andrea Solari,  (1460–1524)
Mary Magdalen, circa 1524
Oil on panel
DH: 29 3/4 x W: 23 5/16 x Approx. D: 1 in. (75.5 x 59.2 x 2.5 cm)
Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, Maryland

Mary Magdalene went to anoint Christ's dead body, only to discover that he was resurrected. She is shown here transferring the ointment from a maiolica pharmacy jar to a smaller vessel. 

According to Church, Mary Magdalene was a sinful woman, who upon meeting Christ repented her former ways. She was present at the Crucifixion and later went to anoint Christ's dead body, only to discover that he was resurrected. As in this painting, the Magdalene is often depicted as a great beauty with long golden hair. She is shown here transferring the ointment from a maiolica pharmacy jar to a smaller vessel. The artist has represented the Magdalene in a style influenced by the works of Leonardo da Vinci, particularly in the subtle "sfumato" technique that invisibly blends light and shade and make contours appear soft. More on this painting

Andrea Solari (also Solario) (1460–1524) was an Italian Renaissance painter of the Milanese school. He was initially named Andre del Gobbo, but more confusingly as Andrea del Bartolo a name shared with two other Italian painters, the 14th Century Siennese Andrea di Bartolo, and the 15th Century Florentine Andrea di Bartolo.


His paintings can be seen in Venice, Milan, The Louvre and the Château de Gaillon (Normandie, France). One of his better-known paintings is the Virgin of the Green Cushion (c. 1507) in the Louvre

Solario was one of the most important followers of Leonardo da Vinci, and brother of Cristoforo Solari, who gave him his first training. In 1490 he accompanied his brother to Venice, where he seems to have been strongly influenced by Antonello da Messina, who was then active in the city. The two brothers returned to Milan in 1493. The Ecce Homo at the Poldi-Pezzoli Museum, notable for its strong modelling, may have been painted soon after his arrival.

In 1507 Andrea Solari went to France with letters of introduction to the Cardinal of Amboise, and was employed for two years on frescoes in the chapel of his castle of Gaillon in Normandy.



Andrea's last work was an altarpiece representing The Assumption of the Virgin, left unfinished at his death and completed by Bernardino Campi about 1576. More on Andrea Solari 




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01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation the bible, With Footnotes - 113

French Follower of Andrea Solario, circa 1600
Ecce homo
oil on oak panel
13 1/2  by 9 5/8  in.; 34.3 by 24.4 cm
Private collection

Ecce homo are the Latin words used by Pontius Pilate in the Vulgate translation of John 19:5, when he presents a scourged Jesus Christ, bound and crowned with thorns, to a hostile crowd shortly before his Crucifixion. The Douay-Rheims Bible translates the phrase into English as "Behold the man!" [John 19:5] The scene has been widely depicted in Christian art. More on Ecce homo

Andrea Solari (also Solario) (1460–1524) was an Italian Renaissance painter of the Milanese school. He was initially named Andre del Gobbo, but more confusingly as Andrea del Bartolo a name shared with two other Italian painters, the 14th Century Siennese Andrea di Bartolo, and the 15th Century Florentine Andrea di Bartolo.


His paintings can be seen in Venice, Milan, The Louvre and the Château de Gaillon (Normandie, France). One of his better-known paintings is the Virgin of the Green Cushion (c. 1507) in the Louvre

Solario was one of the most important followers of Leonardo da Vinci, and brother of Cristoforo Solari, who gave him his first training. In 1490 he accompanied his brother to Venice, where he seems to have been strongly influenced by Antonello da Messina, who was then active in the city. The two brothers returned to Milan in 1493. The Ecce Homo at the Poldi-Pezzoli Museum, notable for its strong modelling, may have been painted soon after his arrival.

In 1507 Andrea Solari went to France with letters of introduction to the Cardinal of Amboise, and was employed for two years on frescoes in the chapel of his castle of Gaillon in Normandy.



Andrea's last work was an altarpiece representing The Assumption of the Virgin, left unfinished at his death and completed by Bernardino Campi about 1576. More on Andrea Solari 





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Saturday, September 15, 2018

01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation the bible, With Footnotes - 114

Andrea Solari, (1460–1524)
Madonna of the Green Cushion, circa 1507
Tempera and oil on poplar wood
Height: 59.5 cm (23.4 in); Width: 47.5 cm (18.7 in)
Louvre Museum 

At the beginning of the 17th century this painting was found in the Cordelier (Franciscan) convent in Blois, but its previous history is unknown. It probably dates to the period of Solario's stay in France (1507-1510) in the service of Georges d'Amboise; it is possible, however, that the work was painted for the latter's nephew, Charles II d'Amboise, governor of the Duchy of Milan, upon the artist's return to Italy.

Madonna with the Green Cushion, a devotional image of the Virgin nursing Jesus, has been so called since the 17th century due to the motif of the green cushion placed on a marble plinth in the foreground. This detail accompanies the scene of family tenderness and well-being. More on this painting

Andrea Solari (also Solario) (1460–1524) was an Italian Renaissance painter of the Milanese school. He was initially named Andre del Gobbo, but more confusingly as Andrea del Bartolo a name shared with two other Italian painters, the 14th Century Siennese Andrea di Bartolo, and the 15th Century Florentine Andrea di Bartolo.


His paintings can be seen in Venice, Milan, The Louvre and the Château de Gaillon (Normandie, France). One of his better-known paintings is the Virgin of the Green Cushion (c. 1507) in the Louvre

Solario was one of the most important followers of Leonardo da Vinci, and brother of Cristoforo Solari, who gave him his first training. In 1490 he accompanied his brother to Venice, where he seems to have been strongly influenced by Antonello da Messina, who was then active in the city. The two brothers returned to Milan in 1493. The Ecce Homo at the Poldi-Pezzoli Museum, notable for its strong modelling, may have been painted soon after his arrival.

In 1507 Andrea Solari went to France with letters of introduction to the Cardinal of Amboise, and was employed for two years on frescoes in the chapel of his castle of Gaillon in Normandy.


Andrea's last work was an altarpiece representing The Assumption of the Virgin, left unfinished at his death and completed by Bernardino Campi about 1576. More on Andrea Solari 




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01 Paintings, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, with footnotes # 25

Gillis Coignet, (1542 – 1599)
Leda and the Swan
Oil on oak panel
96.2 x 126 cm.; 37 3/4  x 49 1/2  in.
Private collection

Leda, in Greek legend, usually believed to be the daughter of Thestius, king of Aetolia, and wife of Tyndareus, king of Lacedaemon. She was also believed to have been the mother (by Zeus, who had approached and seduced her in the form of a swan) of the other twin, Pollux, and of Helen, both of whom hatched from eggs. Variant legends gave divine parentage to both the twins and possibly also to Clytemnestra, with all three of them having hatched from the eggs of Leda, while yet other legends say that Leda bore the twins to her mortal husband, Tyndareus. Still other variants say that Leda may have hatched out Helen from an egg laid by the goddess Nemesis, who was similarly approached by Zeus in the form of a swan.The divine swan’s encounter with Leda was a subject depicted by both ancient Greek and Italian Renaissance artists; Leonardo da Vinci undertook a painting (now lost) of the theme, and Correggio’s Leda (c. 1530s) is a well-known treatment of the subject. More Leda and The Swan

Gillis Coignet, Congnet or Quiniet (c. 1542 – 1599) was a Flemish Renaissance painter, who was strongly influenced by the Italian style. He painted historical and mythological subjects of an easel size, but was more successful in landscapes, in candlelight subjects, and moonlight. He was a Lutheran, which probably influenced his moves from Antwerp to Amsterdam and then Hamburg. He spent most of the 1560s in Italy. More on Gillis Coignet



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Sunday, September 9, 2018

02 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation of the Bible! With Footnotes - 27

Francesco Brina,  (1540–1586)
Madonna and child with young St John, 
Oil on panel
54.5 × 43 cm (21.4 × 16.9 in)
Private collection

This painting depicts the "Virgo lactans," the Latin term for the nursing Virgin Mary. The image testifies to the humanity of Christ as it shows that he consumed food like all other humans. The young Saint John the Baptist, Jesus' second cousin, praying. John the Baptist was the patron saint of Florence, and the painting comes from the Florentine artist Francesco Brina's workshop.


The Madonna and Child or The Virgin and Child is often the name of a work of art which shows the Virgin Mary and the Child Jesus. The word Madonna means "My Lady" in Italian. Artworks of the Christ Child and his mother Mary are part of the Roman Catholic tradition in many parts of the world including Italy, Spain, Portugal, France, South America and the Philippines. Paintings known as icons are also an important tradition of the Orthodox Church and often show the Mary and the Christ Child. They are found particularly in Eastern Europe, Russia, Egypt, the Middle East and India. More Madonna and Child

John the Baptist (sometimes called John in the Wilderness; also referred to as the Angel of the Desert) was the subject of at least eight paintings by the Italian Baroque artist Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571–1610).

The story of John the Baptist is told in the Gospels. John was the cousin of Jesus, and his calling was to prepare the way for the coming of the Messiah. He lived in the wilderness of Judea between Jerusalem and the Dead Sea, "his raiment of camel's hair, and a leather girdle about his loins; and his meat was locusts and wild honey." He baptised Jesus in the Jordan.

According to the Bible, King Herod's daughter Salome requested Saint John the Baptist's beheading. She was prompted by her mother, Herodias, who sought revenge, because the prophet had condemned her incestuous marriage to Herod. More John the Baptist

Francesco Brina,  (1540–1586)
Madonna col Bambino e San Giovannino, 16th century
Oil on panel
75 × 65 cm (29.5 × 25.5 in)
Pandolfini, Florence

Francesco Brina or Del Brina or Brini (1540 – 1586) was an Italian painter of the Mannerist period, active mainly in Florence.


S.J. Freedburg ascribes his training to either Ridolfo Ghirlandaio or more likely his son, Michele di Ridolfo. He holds him to have followed the "most conservative adaptation of the Vasarian maniera". He appeared to limit his output to mostly devotional Madonna and Child paintings, and in this endeavor, paraphrasing the compositions and expressions of Andrea del Sarto. His brother Giovanni Brina (died 1599) helped Francesco in his work and copied his style. More on Francesco Brina 





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Friday, August 24, 2018

01 Paintings and tales of Mermaids, with Footnotes, 8

Ferdinand Leeke,  (1859–1937)
The Mermaid and the Satyr, c. 1917
Oil on canvas
39 x 53.1 in. / 99 x 135 cm
Private collection

A mermaid is a marine creature with the head and upper body of a female human and the tail of a fish. Mermaids appear in the folklore of many cultures worldwide. The first stories appeared in ancient Assyria. Mermaids can be benevolent or beneficent.

In Greek mythology, a satyr is the member of a troop of ithyphallic male companions of Dionysus; they usually have horse-like ears and tails, as well as permanent, exaggerated erections. Early artistic representations sometimes include horse-like legs, but, in 6th-century BC black-figure pottery, human legs are the most common. The faun is a similar woodland-dwelling creature from Roman mythology, which had the body of a man, but the legs, horns, and tail of a goat. In myths, both are often associated with pipe-playing. Greek-speaking Romans often used the Greek term saturos when referring to the Latin faunus, and eventually syncretized the two (the female "Satyresses" were a later invention of poets). They are also known for their focus on sexual desires. They were characterized by the desire to have sexual intercourse with as many women as possible, known as satyriasis. More on satyr 

Ferdinand Leeke (April 7, 1859 - 1923) was a German Painter, famous for his depictions of scenes from Wagnerian Operas. A native of Burg bei Magdeburg, Germany, he studied at the Munich Academy under Johann Herterich (1843-1905), a genre and historical painter, and with Alexander von Wagner (1838-1919), a Hungarian genre and landscape painter. More on Ferdinand Leeke.




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Thursday, August 23, 2018

01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - CONTEMPORARY & 20th Century Interpretation of the Bible! With Footnotes - 21

Magnus Gjoen, United Kingdom
BREAK GLASS FOR RESURRECTION
New Media
31.5 H x 21.7 W x 0 in

An image of Christ being resurrected by someone having broken the glass dome within which he has been sealed. The broken glass at the bottom reads backwards 'so help us God'.


The resurrection of Jesus is the Christian religious belief that, after being put to death, Jesus rose again from the dead. It is the central tenet of Christian theology and part of the Nicene Creed: "On the third day he rose again in accordance with the Scriptures"


Just before sunrise on the day after the regular weekly Sabbath three women, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome, come to anoint Jesus' body, wondering how they would be able to roll the large rock away from the tomb; but they found the rock already rolled aside and a young man in white inside; he told them that Jesus had risen, and that they should tell Peter and the disciples that he will meet them in Galilee, "just as he told you". More The resurrection of Jesus 


Magnus Gjoen was born in London to Norwegian parents. He grew up in Switzerland, Denmark, Italy as well as in the UK. As a contemporary artist Gjoen has exhibited worldwide and questions the notions of beauty by juxtaposing a range of styles and media, incorporating a street and pop aesthetic with a fine art approach. His pieces draw on history and allusion, using existing artworks or fragments from the past to create his own, contemporary aesthetic.  Describing himself as an ‘accidental’ artist, Gjoen studied fine art and fashion design which led to a successful career in fashion, working for brands such as Vivienne Westwood. 

Gjoen’s art offers a modern spin on old masterpieces or manipulates powerful and strong objects into something fragile yet beautiful. By blending two genres from completely different worlds, his art is about rediscovery, taking things from the past and renewing them for the contemporary market. Breathing fresh air into dusty old paintings found in the far corners of a museum or lending a sense of beauty and grace to typically powerful, even dangerous objects, Magnus Gjoen’s work invites a second look. It’s this ability to engage with the viewer and get them questioning, challenging and thinking that makes him a promising and successful young artist in the contemporary art world. More on Magnus Gjoen



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01 Paintings, Olympian deities, by the Old Masters, with footnotes # 24

UMBRIAN-SIENESE SCHOOL
Paris
Oil on poplar panel
48.8 x 28.6 cm.; 19 1/4  x 11 1/4  in.
Private collection


Paris, also known as Alexander, the son of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy, appears in a number of Greek legends. Probably the best known was his elopement with Helen, queen of Sparta, this being one of the immediate causes of the Trojan War. Later in the war, he fatally wounds Achilles in the heel with an arrow as foretold by Achilles’s mother. More on Paris

Umbrian Painting. In 1236 the works of the Basilica of San Francesco in Assisi began, and renowned artists came from different regions, among them Giunta Pisano, Cimabue from Florence, Giotto from Rome, Simone Martini and Pietro Lorenzetti from Siena. Thanks to them, and their followers, Umbria became part of the history of Italian painting. Giotto, with the frescos of upper basilica of Assisi, inaugurated a new pictorial language. The Sienese school prevailed on the others and dominated Umbrian artistic life until the middle of the 15th century. More on Umbrian Paintings



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01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation the bible, With Footnotes - 112

Francesco Lazzaro Guardi
The Madonna Annunciate
Oil on paper, laid down on canvas
12 x 9 cm.; 4 3/4  x 3 1/2  in.
Private collection

The Madonna/ Virgin Annunciate is a painting that shows Mary interrupted at her reading by the Angel of the Annunciation.

The Annunciation referred to as the Annunciation to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Annunciation of Our Lady, or the Annunciation of the Lord, is the Christian celebration of the announcement by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary that she would conceive and become the mother of Jesus, the Son of God, marking his Incarnation. Gabriel told Mary to name her son Yehoshua , meaning "YHWH is salvation".


According to Luke 1:26, the Annunciation occurred "in the sixth month" of Elizabeth's pregnancy. Many Christians observe this event with the Feast of the Annunciation on 25 March, an approximation of the northern vernal equinox nine full months before Christmas, the ceremonial birthday of Jesus. In England, this came to be known as Lady Day. It marked the new year until 1752. The 2nd-century writer Irenaeus of Lyon regarded the conception of Jesus as 25 March coinciding with the Passion. More The Annunciation

Francesco Lazzaro Guardi (October 5, 1712 – January 1, 1793) was an Italian painter of veduta, nobleman, and a member of the Venetian School. He is considered to be among the last practitioners of the classic Venetian school of painting.

In 1735, Guardi moved to the workshop of Michele Marieschi, where he remained until 1743. His first certain works are from 1738, for a parish at Vigo d'Anuania, in Trentino. In this period he worked alongside his older brother.

His works in this period included both landscapes and figure compositions. In 1763 he worked in Murano, in the church of San Pietro Martire, finishing a Miracle of a Dominican Saint.

Francesco Guardi's most important later works include the Doge's Feasts, a series of twelve canvases celebrating the ceremonies held in 1763 for the election of Doge Alvise IV Mocenigo. In circa 1778, he painted the severe Holy Trinity Appearing to Sts. Peter and Paul in the parish church of Roncegno.

In 1782 Guardi was commissioned by the Venetian government six canvases to celebrate the visit of the Russian Archdukes in the city, of which only two remain, and two others for that of Pope Pius VI. On September 12 of that year he was admitted to the Fine Art Academy of Venice.


Guardi died at Campiello de la Madona in Cannaregio (Venice) in 1793. More on Francesco Lazzaro Guardi




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Tuesday, August 21, 2018

May the magic of this Eid bring lots of happiness in your life

My peace and joy embrace your life 

Eid Al Adha translates to the ‘Feast of the Sacrifice.’ Eid al Adha commemorates the time when Prophet Ibrahim wanted to sacrifice his only son Ishmael as an act of his faith to God. Just as he was about to kill his son, Angel Jibreel appeared to him and offered him a sheep for Ishmael’s son. Muslims celebrate Eid al Adha annually to honor Ibrahim’s complete obedience in Allah as well as to act as a reminder for their willingness to sacrifice anything to worship Allah or as per Allah's commands. 






Please visit my other blogs: Art CollectorMythologyMarine Art, and The Canals of Venice

Images are copyright of their respective owners, assignees or others. Some Images may be subject to copyright

I don't own any of these images - credit is always given when due unless it is unknown to me. if I post your images without your permission, please tell me.

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Sunday, August 19, 2018

01 Works, RELIGIOUS ART - Interpretation the bible, With Footnotes - 111

Giovanni Battista Benaschi, or Beinaschi, (1636–1688)
The expulsion from the temple
Oil on canvas
148 x 199 cm.; 58 1/4  x 78 1/4  in.
Private collection

Jesus is stated to have visited the Temple in Jerusalem, where the courtyard is described as being filled with livestock, merchants, and the tables of the money changers. And making a whip of cords, he drove them all out of the temple, with the sheep and oxen. And he poured out the coins of the money-changers and overturned their tables. And he told those who sold the pigeons, "Take these things away; do not make my Father's house a house of trade." More on the expulsion

Giovanni Battista Benaschi, or Beinaschi, (1636–1688) was an Italian painter and engraver active in the Mannerist style.

He was born in Turin. He first trained in the Piedmont, under a painter by the name of Spirito, then was the main pupil of Pietro dal Po in Rome.

Among his patrons were Giovanni Battista Cesalassi and the Jurist Alberettti. In Naples, he painted several ceilings and frescoes, for example at the Chiesa di Santa Maria in Portico, and the cupula of Santi Apostoli. He completed an etching of a Holy Family, after Giovanni Domenico Cerrini, who was his intimate friend.

Relative to Lanfranco's style, Benaschi lightening the tints and attenuating the graphic prominence of the contours of the figures in order to achieve greater chromatic fusion and a more rough pictorialism. This style manifested in the frescoes of the chapel of Santa Maria la Nova, in the paintings of the chapel of St. Michael to the St. Apostoli, then in the fresco executed in the dome of this same church 1680, and then in the Saints on the front arches of the chapel of the church of the Gerolamini (1681).

Being ill he retired to live in the convent of Santa Maria delle Grazie in Caponapoli where he decorated the church with a vast cycle of frescoes executed with the help of Orazio Frezza and Giuseppe Castellano and depicting episodes from the Life of Christ and Virgin. During a hospitalization in that monastery, he died on the 28th of September 1688. More on Giovanni Battista Benaschi




Please visit my other blogs: Art CollectorMythologyMarine Art, and The Canals of Venice

Images are copyright of their respective owners, assignees or others. Some Images may be subject to copyright

I don't own any of these images - credit is always given when due unless it is unknown to me. if I post your images without your permission, please tell me.

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