Wednesday, March 11, 2015

The Lilith Myth

There are several accounts of the Lilith Mythology.

The biblical book of Genesis contains two contradictory accounts of humanity’s creation. In the Priestly version, Genesis 1:26-27, Lilith, Adam's first wife, was created at the same time as Adam, and from the same earth. This contrasts with Eve, who was created from one of Adam's ribs. Lilith (some times called Lamia) left Adam after she refused to become subservient to him and then would not return to the Garden of Eden after she coupled with the archangel Samael. The resulting Lilith legend is still commonly used as source material in modern Western culture, literature, occultism, fantasy, and horror.

Burney Relief, Babylon (1800-1750 BCE). The figure in the relief was sometimes identified with Lilith, based on a misreading of an outdated translation of the Epic of Gilgamesh. Modern research has identified the figure as either Ishtar or Ereshkigal.

In the Bible, the only occurrence of lilith is in the Book of Isaiah 34:14, The Hebrew word lilit (or lilith) appears in a list of eight unclean animals, some of which may have demonic associations. Translators often associated the complete list of eight creatures as one whole. More at: From Wikipedia

Hon John CollierBritish, 1850 - 1934 - Lilith - Date: 1887  

Lilith was said to be a figure of terror, feared as a demon or vampire, and a night monster. She is also known as Lamia; Keats describes her as a serpent which assumed the shape of a beautiful woman 'palpitating snake ... of dazzling hue, vermillion spotted, golden, green and blue', and it is this image which seems to have captured Collier's imagination. The subject also attracted John William Waterhouse and the Symbolists. From: ArtMagick

From Adam's union with this demoness, and with another like her named Naamah, Tubal Cain's sister, sprang Asmodeus and innumerable demons that still plague mankind. Many generations later, Lilith and Naamah came to Solomon's judgement seat, disguised as harlots of Jerusalem'.

Michelangelo's painting on the Vatican's Sistine Chapel depicting a serpentine Lilith with Adam and Eve. (1508-12).  There is evidence in Genesis that the Serpent can be identified as Lilith.


Scholars are not certain where the character of Lilith originally comes from, though many believe she was inspired by Sumerian myths about female vampires called “Lillu” or Mesopotamian myths about succubae (female night demons) called “lilin.”


Lilith is also a white-eyed demon who was at one point human. She is the first demon to ever be created, her soul having been twisted by Lucifer as an act of spite against God. Due to her status as the first demon, she is the last of the 66 Seals, with her death breaking the last seal and releasing Lucifer from the Cage he was imprisoned in for her creation.



Powers and Abilities:
Can emanate a blast of explosive white energy from her palm that can decimate structures and presumably anyone caught in the way.She has great control over this power, able to prevent it from affecting specific targets whilst destroying others.
Holds the contracts to all deals made by Crossroads Demons and can therefore break whichever ones she pleases,as Queen of the Crossroads. In addition to holding all contracts, Lilith has the authority to make deals of her own. Unusually, she claims that a deal with her will take a sexual act to seal it rather than the kiss typical to all other demons.
Can possess humans.
Is telekinetic.
Is impervious to holy water.
Can pull other demons from their meatsuits and send them back to Hell.[8] Conversely, she can also send demons in Hell onto Earth.
Can burn things by touch. Lilith can also control the intensity of this power
Has superhuman strength.
Can kill other demons.

Can teleport.






Black Moon LilithDamned if we do, damned if we don’t! So, don’t do! Crawling forth from the great ocean, lost in the desert, aspiring to the heavens,  returning to the ocean, Lilith represents our rise from the ashes.

Lilith, by Michel Desimon, French, 1930-40

Lilith In The Garden by Dawn Austin